Economy

Tillamook County's economy today is built on a foundation of dairy & agriculture, forest products, fishing and, increasingly, tourism. Tourism on the North coast accounted for $673 million of Oregon's $9.6 billion tourism economy in 2013 and supports some 7,350 jobs, sparking renewed efforts within Tillamook County to attract more out-of-town visitors to support a transitioning economy*. At the same time, ag and forest products sectors in Tillamook County are not being replaced by tourism at the rates they are in some neighboring coastal counties, indicating a balance of increased tourism along with continued reliance on forest products, agriculture and outdoor recreation will continue to drive Tillamook County's economy moving forward.

The Salmon SuperHwy project's focus on fixing problem culverts and other fish barriers supports each of these economic sectors in real and lasting ways:

  • We're seeking to invest $34 million over 10 years for fish passage projects in Tillamook County, mostly through road infrastructure improvements; that $34 million projects out to about $53 million in positive economic impact in Tillamook County
  • A stable and reliable road infrastructure is critical to the ag and dairy industries of Tillamook County and the North Coast. Surface roads and local highways are the supply lines for farms and for commodities and products to reach markets.
  • The Salmon SuperHwy investments we're seeking to make over 10 years are expected to generate about 400 local jobs
  • Visitors to the North Coast spent about $667 million in 2013. By upgrading roads, and promoting stewardship of natural resources that attract visitors - like fish and rivers -the Salmon SuperHwy Project supports this growing segment of the local economy.
  • Tourism supports about 7,350 local jobs on the North Coast. By upgrading roads, and promoting stewardship of natural resources that attract visitors - like fish and rivers -the Salmon SuperHwy Project supports this growing segment of the local economy.
  • Money spent by visitors to the North Coast in 2013 generated some $9.3 million in local tax revenue and $17 million in state taxes. By upgrading roads, and promoting stewardship of natural resources that attract visitors - like fish and rivers -the Salmon SuperHwy Project supports this growing segment of the local economy.
*Oregon Travel Impacts 1991-2013p, Dean Runyan and Associates